Urgent action needed on Indigenous deaths in police custody

Prisoner In Jailsource: Griffith University
published: 19 December 2019

Recent high-profile deaths of Indigenous people in police custody show a lack of meaningful progress despite over 25 years since the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody says a Griffith University law professor.

Professor Elena Marchetti says while a recent Australian Institute of Criminology report shows deaths of Indigenous people have declined proportionally and are fewer than non-Indigenous deaths in prison, there was less certainty about police custody deaths.

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Voices from the criminal injustice system : ‘I am Troy Davis’

Troy Davis
Troy Davis

originally by: Workers World
published: 18 December 2019

A sold-out crowd at Rattlesticks Theater in the West Village on Dec. 8 heard readings from the book “I Am Troy Davis,” which features the stories of dozens of people whose lives have been cruelly affected by the state and its racist criminal injustice system. 

Troy Davis, an African-American man accused of killing a cop, was executed in Georgia on Sept. 21, 2011, despite seven of nine witnesses recanting their trial testimony and a mountain of uncovered evidence proving his innocence.

The book was written by Davis’ sister, Martina Davis Correia, and Jen Marlow. Correia, who died after a long battle with cancer, fought with every fiber of her body over several decades to prove her brother’s innocence and to stop his execution.

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The crisis of Aboriginal women held in prison in Australia

Domiciliary Prisonsource: Aljazeera News
published: 2 December 2019

Melbourne, Australia – Vickie Roach was 12 the first time she was imprisoned.

Forty-eight years ago, in the early 1970s, she was arrested after running away from abusive foster homes and institutions.

“The morning after you arrive, you have to go see the doctor. They would examine you to see if you were pregnant or had STDs. And if you weren’t cooperative they would hold you down and do it,” said Roach, now 60.

For a young girl who had been sexually abused, this procedure was “traumatic”. But her contact with the criminal justice system in Australia began even earlier – when she was two. 

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