Racist G4S guard still allowed to work in private security industry

Jimmy Mubenga
Jimmy Mubenga

originally by: Morning Star
published: 13 February 2014

A disgraced guard involved in the “unlawful killing” of a refugee on a deportation flight has obtained a Home Office-approved licence to continue working in private security, according to the industry’s regulator.

Notorious racist Terence ‘Terry’ Hughes is still allowed by the Security Industry Authority (SIA) to work as a professional guard, despite his role in the death of Angolan man Jimmy Mubenga while working for G4S nine years ago.

Passengers say Mr Mubenga, a father of five, shouted “I can’t breathe” as he was restrained by Mr Hughes and two G4S colleagues who were involved in deporting him on a British Airways flight in 2010. Mr Mubenga then collapsed and died of cardiac arrest.

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Eric Garner: no charges against white police officer over chokehold death

Eric Garner
Eric Garner

source: The Guardian
published: 16 July 2019

Federal prosecutors will not charge the New York police officer implicated in the chokehold death of Eric Garner, an African American man killed almost five years ago.

The decision announced by the US attorney Richard Donoghue on Tuesday was another blow to the Garner family, figureheads in the Black Lives Matter movement, who have campaigned to hold the NYPD accountable. US justice department sources said the final call on the non-indictment was made by the attorney general, William Barr.

Garner’s death, on 17 July 2014, became a focal point for national conversation on race and policing. Garner’s last words, “I can’t breathe”, were chanted by protesters across the US.

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Minor offences may stay secret after legal challenge fails

The Royal Courts of Justicesource: The Guardian Law
published: 30 January 2019

People given police cautions or reprimands as children or those convicted of multiple minor offences may not have to disclose them in future after the government lost a legal challenge to the criminal record checks system.

In a complex ruling on four separate cases, the supreme court rejected three of the appeals by the Home Office over the issue of whether those who were found guilty of lesser offences or cautions need to disclose them when seeking employment involving contact with children and vulnerable adults.

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