New stage reached in the struggle to free Mumia Abu-Jamal

Mumia Abu-Jamal

source: Workers World
published: 3 December 2019

Political prisoner and world-renowned journalist Mumia Abu-Jamal and his supporters are closer than ever to winning his release, 38 years after he was imprisoned for a crime he did not commit.

The Fraternal Order of Police, former district attorneys and other political higher-ups who participated in the frameup are now shaking in their boots because this innocent man may be given a new trial in which judicial, police and prosecutorial misconduct will be exposed.

In the late 1970s and early 80s, Abu-Jamal was a daily radio reporter for WHYY and NPR who earned acclaim for his award-winning reporting. As a reporter who supported the MOVE organization against state repression, he drew the ire of the Philadelphia FOP and the notoriously racist Police Commissioner and later Mayor Frank Rizzo.

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Mark Duggan shooting report challenged by human rights groups

Carole Duggan & Nephew, Mark Duggan
Carole Duggan & Nephew, Mark Duggan

originally by: The Guardian
published: 5 December 2019

The official report into the police shooting of a man whose death sparked the 2011 riots is facing a new challenge from human rights investigators who say a virtual model of the shooting shows its main conclusion is wrong.

The shooting of Mark Duggan, 29, in Tottenham, north London, in August 2011, triggered the biggest riots in modern English history.

An investigation by the police watchdog found he was most likely shot while holding a gun that he was probably “in the process of throwing” away.

An illegal firearm was found over a fence and 14 feet (4.35 metres) from where Duggan fell. None of the police officers surrounding him saw it flying through the air.

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The crisis of Aboriginal women held in prison in Australia

Domiciliary Prisonsource: Aljazeera News
published: 2 December 2019

Melbourne, Australia – Vickie Roach was 12 the first time she was imprisoned.

Forty-eight years ago, in the early 1970s, she was arrested after running away from abusive foster homes and institutions.

“The morning after you arrive, you have to go see the doctor. They would examine you to see if you were pregnant or had STDs. And if you weren’t cooperative they would hold you down and do it,” said Roach, now 60.

For a young girl who had been sexually abused, this procedure was “traumatic”. But her contact with the criminal justice system in Australia began even earlier – when she was two. 

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