The truth about British Army abuses in Iraq must come out

Legal & Justicesource: The Guardian
published: 3 October 2016

In the past few days a number of politicians and former generals have criticised the so-called hounding of British soldiers by what they claim are just money-grabbing lawyers launching ill-founded cases into alleged wartime abuse.

Criticising the work of the Iraq Historic Allegations Team (Ihat), Tim Collins, the retired colonel who led British troops in Iraq, said the allegations were being made by “parasitic lawyers”. Theresa May has said she wants to end the “industry” of vexatious claims. And Tony Blair, who launched the military action in Iraq and Afghanistan, said: “I am very sorry that our soldiers and their families have been put through this ordeal.”

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Tony Blair ‘will not be investigated for breaking international law’ in the Iraq War inquiry

Tony Blairsource: The Independent
published: 27 May 2016

Tony Blair will not be investigated for breaking any laws in the Iraq War inquiry report, despite claims the intervention was illegal.

Sources close to the inquiry, also known as the Chilcot Report, said it would “not seek to determine the guilt of innocence of anybody on trial”, according to The Sunday Telegraph.

The report, due to be published in July, will not make “any judgements on the legality or anything like that, that is not the purpose [of the report]”, the source said.

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Why do Republicans insist on keeping cleared men at Guantánamo?

Guantanamosource: Guardian | Comment is free
published: 15 January 2015

Pity the Guantánamo Bay detainee: he is the easiest target for the politicians who wish to be seen “doing something” about terrorism, but who are entirely indifferent to these men’s lives or whether continuing our failed policies there will make anyone safer.

The latest example: four Senators, who on Tuesday introduced another bill seeking to cut off any funding which could allow detainees – including men long cleared for release by federal agents – to leave this legal black hole. One of the four is John McCain, who campaigned for president in 2008 saying that the detention center at Guantánamo needed to be closed.

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