Racist G4S guard still allowed to work in private security industry

Jimmy Mubenga
Jimmy Mubenga

originally by: Morning Star
published: 13 February 2014

A disgraced guard involved in the “unlawful killing” of a refugee on a deportation flight has obtained a Home Office-approved licence to continue working in private security, according to the industry’s regulator.

Notorious racist Terence ‘Terry’ Hughes is still allowed by the Security Industry Authority (SIA) to work as a professional guard, despite his role in the death of Angolan man Jimmy Mubenga while working for G4S nine years ago.

Passengers say Mr Mubenga, a father of five, shouted “I can’t breathe” as he was restrained by Mr Hughes and two G4S colleagues who were involved in deporting him on a British Airways flight in 2010. Mr Mubenga then collapsed and died of cardiac arrest.

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Democratic delegation to investigate migrant child’s death

Legal Black Gavel

source: Politico
published: 4 January 2019

Reps. Joaquín Castro (D-Texas) and Xochitl Torres Small (D-N.M.) will lead a congressional delegation to the border Monday to investigate a migrant child’s death in the custody of U.S. agents.

Castro and Torres Small will lead at least four House members and Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) to Alamogordo, N.M., where an 8-year-old Guatemalan boy died of illness on Christmas Eve. The delegation includes Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.), who plans to investigate the matter as part of his immigration oversight agenda. Castro has been a vocal opponent of President Donald Trump’s border wall, accusing the administration of seeking money from Congress while neglecting humanitarian provisions for migrants.

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The Guardian Reports : Five myths about the refugee crisis

Woman refugeesource: The Guardian
published: 5 June 2018

The refugee crisis that dominated the news in 2015 and 2016 consisted primarily of a sharp rise in the number of people coming to Europe to claim asylum.

Arrivals have now dropped, and governments have cracked down on the movement of undocumented migrants within the EU; many thousands are stuck in reception centres or camps in southern Europe, while others try to make new lives in the places they have settled.

But to see the crisis as an event that began in 2015 and ended the following year is a mistake, because it obscures the fact that the underlying causes have not changed.

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