Stage play inspired by Sheku Bayoh to examine Scotland’s racist underbelly

Sheku Bayoh & Family
Sheku Bayoh & Family

source: The Scotsman
published: 7 August 2019

A powerful new play inspired by the case of a father-of-two who died in police custody in Scotland and intended to explore how racist the country really is, is being developed by one of its leading theatres.

The Royal Lyceum in Edinburgh is working with an acclaimed poet and writer on Lament for Sheku, which will examine how much prejudice exists in Scotland’s institu­tions and in our wider society.

Hannah Lavery, who has already created a spoken word show recalling her experiences of growing up in a mixed-race family in Edinburgh, said the play was aimed at revealing the human tragedy behind the Sheku Bayoh case, which triggered accusations of racism within Police Scotland.

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Mothers of the movement for Black lives continue to pursue justice

Legal Time for justicesource: The San Diago
published: 1 June 2019

Mother’s Day [US] marked a celebration of the mother-child bond by millions worldwide. For Mothers of the Movement, a group of African American women whose children were killed by police or senseless gun violence, the celebrations are bittersweet.

Over the years, the women have become an influential voice in the Black Lives Matter movement with their strong voices of protest and pursuit of active community involvement in criminal justice reform and gun law legislation. Their work at the grassroots, local, state, and national levels continues today.

Here’s what some of them have been up to recently.

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Is prison necessary? Ruth Wilson Gilmore might change your mind

Broken Prison Barssource: New York Times
published: 17 April 2019

There’s an anecdote that Ruth Wilson Gilmore likes to share about being at an environmental-justice conference in Fresno in 2003. People from all over California’s Central Valley had gathered to talk about the serious environmental hazards their communities faced, mostly as a result of decades of industrial farming, conditions that still have not changed. (The air quality in the Central Valley is the worst in the nation, and one million of its residents drink tap water more poisoned than the water in Flint, Mich.)

There was a “youth track” at the conference, in which children were meant to talk about their worries and then decide as a group what was most important to be done in the name of environmental justice.

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