The cuts that broke the justice system

Blind justice lawsource: Politics.co.uk
published: 26 November 2018

Leaking roofs, seats held together with gaffer tape, flooded toilets, broken heating and broken plug sockets. If our hospitals or schools looked like this, there’d be a public outcry. But these are our courts, so no-one really cares.

The cuts to criminal justice have become visible in the furniture of the court system, but they go much further than that. They are eroding the basic principles it operates under.

Next year, legal aid reaches its 70th birthday. It is a landmark principle that justice should be free to everyone, that publicly-funded legal advice should be available to those accused of a crime by the state.

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Capital punishment should be a thing of the past

Image Credit Naypong at www.FreeDigitalPhotos.netsource: Reflector Online
published: 11 April 2018

Gone are the days when people were publicly hanged for their crimes, but we don’t live in a better society. Just because criminals’ deaths aren’t on full display doesn’t mean they are no longer being slaughtered for something they probably did, but may have not done.

Since the death penalty was reinstated by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1976, about 1,500 people have been executed, according to an article from CNN. The Death Penalty Information Center notes that there are over 2,800 people currently on death row, which is far too many. That number should be zero.

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Death penalty use and support near record lows

Wimain in prison cellsource: ProCon.org
published: 21 December 2017

Overall use and public support of the death penalty is in decline. As of Nov. 8, 2017, 23 people were executed in the United States in 2017, the second-lowest number since 1991.

39 people are expected to be sentenced to death by the end of 2017, making it the second-lowest number since 1976, the year when capital punishment was declared constitutional again by the US Supreme Court.

Since the death penalty was legalized again in 1976 by the US Supreme Court, 1,465 people have been executed. Texas has accounted for 545 executions, over a third of the nation’s total.

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