Sheku Bayoh: Family feel ‘betrayed’ over decision not to prosecute officers

Justice 4 Sheku Bayoh @ UFFC Rally London 2018
Justice 4 Sheku Bayoh @ UFFC London 2018

source: BBC News
published: 11 November 2019

The family of a Fife man who died in police custody said they felt “betrayed” after being told that no-one will be prosecuted over his death. Sheku Bayoh never regained consciousness after being restrained by officers in a Kirkcaldy street in 2015.

The 31-year-old, who had taken the drugs MDMA and Flakka, was found to have suffered 23 separate injuries.

His family said CCTV and phone footage cast doubt on claims made by officers about events leading up to his death. They have described the decision not to prosecute the officers as a “betrayal of justice” and are now calling for a public inquiry

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Film-making pair team up to tell British woman’s story [Ruth Ellis]

Ruth Ellis
Ruth Ellis

source: Rome Sentinel
published: 9 November 2019

She was the last woman hanged in Great Britain after being convicted of shooting her lover to death. And a director/producer in Los Angeles, originally from Rome, and a cameraman/videographer from Barneveld, are teaming up to tell her story.

Peter-Henry Schroeder, owner and operator of PHS Productions, owes his acting roots to his mother Marie Angotti-Schroeder, who while living in Syracuse, enrolled her sons and daughter in the Syracuse Children’s Theatre, which continues today.

While his two brothers pursued other avenues, Peter-Henry and sister Maria Curley, continued with their passions for the performing arts. Curley is the co-founder of Present Company Productions, an Oneida-based theater company that produces, among its projects, dinner theater at Theodore’s Restaurant in Canastota.

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Police spied on grieving families for decades. Now we want the truth

Undercover Spy Hidingsource: Guardian Communities
published: 25 October 2019

How many black families have been targeted by undercover police officers? This is the simple question we are still waiting for authorities to answer.

More than five years have passed since Theresa May, then the home secretary, announced a public inquiry following “profoundly shocking” evidence that Met police undercover officers had spied on the grieving parents of murdered teenager Stephen Lawrence, as well as their campaign to get justice for their son.

Despite Sir John Mitting’s ongoing undercover policing inquiry spending £21m since 2015, public hearings will only commence in the summer of 2020.

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