Racist G4S guard still allowed to work in private security industry

Jimmy Mubenga
Jimmy Mubenga

originally by: Morning Star
published: 13 February 2014

A disgraced guard involved in the “unlawful killing” of a refugee on a deportation flight has obtained a Home Office-approved licence to continue working in private security, according to the industry’s regulator.

Notorious racist Terence ‘Terry’ Hughes is still allowed by the Security Industry Authority (SIA) to work as a professional guard, despite his role in the death of Angolan man Jimmy Mubenga while working for G4S nine years ago.

Passengers say Mr Mubenga, a father of five, shouted “I can’t breathe” as he was restrained by Mr Hughes and two G4S colleagues who were involved in deporting him on a British Airways flight in 2010. Mr Mubenga then collapsed and died of cardiac arrest.

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Stage play inspired by Sheku Bayoh to examine Scotland’s racist underbelly

Sheku Bayoh & Family
Sheku Bayoh & Family

source: The Scotsman
published: 7 August 2019

A powerful new play inspired by the case of a father-of-two who died in police custody in Scotland and intended to explore how racist the country really is, is being developed by one of its leading theatres.

The Royal Lyceum in Edinburgh is working with an acclaimed poet and writer on Lament for Sheku, which will examine how much prejudice exists in Scotland’s institu­tions and in our wider society.

Hannah Lavery, who has already created a spoken word show recalling her experiences of growing up in a mixed-race family in Edinburgh, said the play was aimed at revealing the human tragedy behind the Sheku Bayoh case, which triggered accusations of racism within Police Scotland.

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Mothers of the movement for Black lives continue to pursue justice

Legal Time for justicesource: The San Diago
published: 1 June 2019

Mother’s Day [US] marked a celebration of the mother-child bond by millions worldwide. For Mothers of the Movement, a group of African American women whose children were killed by police or senseless gun violence, the celebrations are bittersweet.

Over the years, the women have become an influential voice in the Black Lives Matter movement with their strong voices of protest and pursuit of active community involvement in criminal justice reform and gun law legislation. Their work at the grassroots, local, state, and national levels continues today.

Here’s what some of them have been up to recently.

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